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These Are History’s Sickest Special-Edition Corvettes

SOURCE: Aaron Young for HotCars.com

Ranging from pure performance monsters to cool and unique designs, here are some of the coolest forms the Corvette has taken over the years.

Long live America’s sports car – first shown to the world at GM’s Motorama in 1953, the Corvette is nearing its 70th anniversary as the premier American sports car, and one that has come to represent the American performance game. With its signature V8 power, and price that makes it a great value for the performance, the Corvette has stuck around in the hearts and minds of enthusiasts, even through its darkest years during the Oil Crisis.

Along the way through, the Corvette has also been defined by a multitude of special editions. Ranging from pure performance monsters to awesome looking aesthetic changes, the special edition Corvettes have been some of the coolest forms the car has taken over its long life. These 10 though, are among the sickest special edition Corvettes to ever hit the street.

10/10

1967 L88

The greatest of all classic Corvettes, the L88 is an absolutely wicked, special, and rare ‘Vette that now commands millions of dollars at auction.

Unleashed onto the world in 1967, the L88’s development was carried out under command of Zora Arkus-Duntov himself. Packing plenty of racing-oriented modifications, the L88 was intended to help further the Corvette’s status as a motorsports icon. But, what was truly special about the L88, was its engine. Thoroughly modified, the legendary 427 V8 inside the ‘Vette was brought up to a truly wild number of around 580 hp.

Stripped of most comfort based options and features, GM tried to scare people away from buying the monstrous car. Down-rating it, and claiming the engine had 435 hp, intentions were for people to be scared off by the lack of “civilized” features, and opt for another performance package that included them while having similar power. Mostly ending up used as race cars (to GM’s relief), only 20 L88 Corvettes were made in 1967, making them one of the most powerful, and rare special editions in the Corvette’s history.

9/10

1970 ZR1

A familiar name in the modern Corvette’s legacy, the ZR1 began life as a successor to the earth-shattering L88, and still stands for the ultimate performance edition a Corvette can have.

Sold under a Regular Production Order (RPO) from 1970 until 1972, the ZR1 was similar to the L88 in that ordering it meant you had to sacrifice many comfort-based options such as air conditioning, the radio, and power steering. What you got in return though, were specialized performance parts like beefy suspension, a performance transmission, and big brakes. More importantly, though, the ZR1 gave you the special LT1 small-block V8 laying down 370 hp, turning the C3 Corvette into a monster. Yet, only 25 ZR1s were sold in 1970, making it among the rarest special edition Corvettes.

8/10

1990 ZR-1

With the Corvette losing most of its performance and overall greatness during the tail end of the C3 generation, and the first years of the C4, the 1990 ZR1 came about to reclaim the nameplate’s glory as a performance monster.

Named “King of the Hill” during its development, this revival of the ZR1 would live up to that name in spades. Forgoing the standard V8 that had been powering the C4, a special 5.7 L LT5 V8 making 380 hp was mounted inside – developing over 400 hp by the end of its run. Not just powerful though, at the time GM owned Lotus and brought them on to make the ZR1 handle as well as it accelerated. An instant success, the 1990 ZR1 was one of the fastest cars of the early ’90s, helping rekindle the Corvette’s flame, and remaining on sale until 1995.

7/10

1966 Grand Sport

While somewhat overshadowed by the 1990-95 ZR1, the 1996 Grand Sport was an awesome way to send off the C4 generation Corvette.

Built as an homage to the ’60s Grand Sport Corvette racecars, the 1996 Grand Sport was situated in a tough position. With the C4 ZR1 ending in 1995, and the all-new C5 ready for release in 1997, Chevy needed to make a splash with a special edition for the C4’s retirement.

While not the performance beast that the ZR1 was, the Grand Sport was one of the coolest C4 Corvettes to be released. Tuning the LT1 V8 to 330 hp, and renaming it the LT4, the Grand Sport was genuinely quick for the late ’90s. Sporting the iconic blue and white paint with red fender marks, the 1996 Grand Sport did its job of sending off the C4 with great style and set the tone for later Grand Sport editions of the Corvette.

6/10

2004 Z06 Commemorative Edition

Similar to the 1996 Grand Sport, the 2004 Commemorative Edition was a send-off for the C5 generation of Corvette, and focused on a flashy red, white, and blue paint job.

With the C6 on the horizon for 2005, and the C5-R Corvette racecar scoring consecutive class wins at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the Commemorative Edition sent off the C5 generation by celebrating those Le Mans victories.

Available on either the coupe, convertible, or Z06 flavors of Corvette, the Commemorative Edition was mostly just aesthetic changes. Painted in the same base scheme as the Le Mans C5-R, the Commemorative Edition came with plenty of cool touches like badges and seat embroidery. One performance touch present though, order the Commemorative Edition Z06, and you had the option to add a carbon fiber hood.

5/10

2009 ZR1

Bringing the special edition ZR1 nameplate back for its third shot at crushing the performance game, 2009 saw it return with the greatest power of any road-going Corvette before it.

Gone from the market since the previous one’s end in 1995, the ZR1 returned with ferocity after 14 years. Like the previous ZR1s it followed in the footsteps of, a monstrous and unique engine was placed inside – the supercharged LS9 V8 spitting out a whopping 638 hp. With features like a window in the hood that displays the supercharger, the most power a stock Corvette had up until it, and a 200 MPH+ top speed, the 2009 ZR1 helped prove that the Corvette was a competitive force in the modern car industry.

4/10

2011 Z06 Carbon Limited Edition

Another special edition that celebrates the Corvette’s long-lived presence at Le Mans, the Z06 Carbon Limited Edition does more than just add a special paint job though.

Limited to just 500, the Z06 Carbon Limited Edition takes the already performance-oriented Z06 and imbues it with performance parts from the monstrous ZR1. Included in the Carbon Limited Edition are the big carbon-ceramic brakes, adjustable shocks, wheels, and tires from the ZR1. But that’s not all, as the “Carbon” in its name also refers to the carbon fiber front splitter, hood, and roof panel it comes with. Only available in a special shade of blue or orange, the Carbon Limited Edition is one of the coolest modern Corvette special editions.

3/10

2013 427 Convertible

A number that will be instantly recognizable to Chevy fans, the 427 Convertible pays tribute to the legendary 427 big-block V8 of Chevy’s muscle car past.

While the Z06 is a favorite amongst Corvette fans for its balance of performance, affordability, and ease of street use, one of its best features on the C6 generation was the 505 hp LS7 V8. Although the Z06 and its LS7 didn’t come in convertible form – the 427 Convertible changed that.

While missing Z06 exclusive features like its aluminum frame, the 427 Convertible drops the LS7 into a convertible Corvette and adds touches like a special paint scheme, and the rear axle and shock absorbers from the Z06. Back to the name though, the LS7 is technically a 427.7 cu-in engine, but Chevy rounded down to pay tribute to their classic big block, it’s a technicality that’s easy to forgive though, especially when the car is this cool.

2/10

2019 ZR1

The 4th, and most powerful iteration of the legendary ZR1, the C7 based edition is also the last time ZR1 will be used on the Corvette’s traditional front-engine layout.

Even better, or worse – depending on your perspective, the C8 ZR1 is confirmed to be a hybrid. But back to the C7 ZR1 – serving as the 4th time the special edition ZR1 has graced Chevy showrooms, the 2019 ZR1 evolved from the 2009 version with even more ridiculous amounts of power. Capable of a 0-60 MPH time of 3.0 seconds thanks to the 755 hp its supercharged LT5 V8 produces, the 2019 ZR1 is the most powerful and most insane stock Corvette so far – though, the C8 ZR1 is said to be shooting for 900 hp.

1/10

2016 Z06 C7/R Edition

A team with many decades of racing legacy, Corvette Racing’s C7.R is the focus of this special edition, using a Z06 to pay tribute to the full-on racecar and its iconic yellow paint.

Limited to only 500 units, the C7.R edition was available on Z06 Corvettes and offered the Z07 Performance Package with its carbon-ceramic Brembo brakes. Otherwise, the C7.R Edition is mostly an aesthetic one, packing Corvette Racing Yellow paint, special graphics, wheels, yellow brake calipers, as well as a black interior with yellow contrast stitching. Equipped with the C7 Z06’s supercharged LT4 V8 with 650 hp, the C7.R Edition is one of the coolest for fans of the Corvette Racing team.

SOURCE: Aaron Young for HotCars.com


[VIDEO] Watch a Time Lapse Video of a C8 Corvette Going Through PDI at a Chevy Dealership

[VIDEO] Watch a Time Lapse Video of a C8 Corvette Going Through PDI at a Chevy Dealership


When Corvettes are shipped to a Chevrolet dealership, they have to go through a pre-delivery inspection known as PDI. Service technicians take the cars fresh off the truck into the service bays where they run through a checklist of things to do that include installing any parts and accessories as well as checking and topping off the fluids.

We’ve talked about the PDI process previously, and have even shared some of the processes like the installation of a High Wing. Now here’s a chance to watch a 2020 Corvette going through PDI with a time-lapse video that condenses the hour-and-a-half process into just under 5 minutes. While we don’t really learn anything new from the video, we are treated to a scene that most of us will never see.

The video was posted to YouTube by a user named “I Sell Corvettes“:

The long version time-lapse of the C8 pre-delivery inspection. This C8 is a fairly basic, non-Z51 so the PDI is pretty quick and easy, less than an hour and a half.


Source:
YouTube

Keith Cornett 


Watch 1,000-HP C8 Corvette Set 9-Second Quarter-Mile

And there’s still more in the tank.

The Chevrolet Corvette Stingray C8 has been hailed as a performance bargain since it first arrived on the scene, but if you’re saving money on the cost of a car, that just means you have more money left over to make it even faster and better. For some, that can even include altering its appearance for a more exotic look. But while some prefer technical circuit racing, where the C8 excels too, the most popular form of motorsport in America is arguably drag racing. We know that a standard C8 with 495 horsepower and 470 lb-ft of torque can clock a 10-second quarter-mile, but now someone has made it into the nines.

Extreme Turbo Systems, a company famous for mind-blowingly powerful Nissan GTRs, has just set a new record for the C8, achieving a time of 9.95 seconds at 144 mph. Naturally, this required some extensive modifications, with the ETS C8 receiving new Mahle pistons Ferrea and valves, Mickey Thompson drag radial tires, a bespoke intercooler with an ice box, and direct port methanol injection. As imperative as these mods are, it’s the addition of Precision turbochargers with 46 millimeter wastegates that truly elevates the ETS C8 to a new level.

With 13 psi of boost, this Stingray produces 872 hp. 18 psi generates 980 horses, and then 20 psi gets the team into quadruple digits with an astonishing 1,021 hp. That’s more than double what the car comes with in stock form.

But as any racing enthusiast will tell you, a dyno run does not prove that your car is fast. Thus, ETS headed to Woodburn Dragstrip to lay down some rubber, and despite battling some launch control and transmission issues, achieved some incredible figures. At 11 psi, a time of 10.49 seconds was achieved at 141 mph. Turned up to 13.5 psi, the C8 managed 10.05 at 145 mph. Being that close to the single digits with no breakages, it only makes sense to turn it up again. Interestingly, although the team achieved 9.95 at 144 mph, this was done with just 15 psi, meaning less than 980 hp. Assuming that transmission and launch issues can be resolved and more power put down, this car may achieve mid-nine-second passes very soon.

SEBASTIAN CENIZO


2020 Corvette Named Car of the Year by Popular Mechanics

2020 Corvette Named Car of the Year by Popular Mechanics

Photo Credit: Chevrolet


Livable.
Comfortable.
Mostly pleasant.
Quiet.
A good balance.
Pleasantly terrifying.
Thrilling.

Those are a few of the ways Popular Mechanics describes the 2020 Corvette Stingray, the new mid-engine monster from Chevrolet so good it’s just become that magazine’s Car of the Year.

“So much of what makes Ferraris, McLarens, and Lamborghinis the stuff of phone wallpaper fantasy is present” in the new Corvette, Popular Mechanics writes.

Things like a 0 to 60 time of 2.8 seconds “with a pleasantly terrifying exhaust sound.”

With the seats so far forward, the Corvette gives you “that tip-of-the-cruise-missile feeling.”

Even after a week-long test drive, Popular Mechanics says the car never lost its novelty, noting that “it is thrilling to hold the keys to this thing.”

Unlike so many other supercars, the new Corvette is still a practical vehicle, with PM calling it “livable. Actually comfortable.”

With two trunks that hold 13 cubic feet of stuff, the Stingray can fit two week’s worth of groceries for three people.

Even a four-hour trip in heavy traffic and rain was “mostly pleasant,” the magazine reports, with sound dampening materials that “kept the cockpit quiet at highway speeds.”

Even the “strange center bar with the air conditioning controls made sense within just a few miles of our first drive,” PM admitted.

It wasn’t all butterflies and rainbows, though, as the magazine did point out a few minor nitpicks with the car.

The overall comfort means that the Corvette “loses some of the vibration that helps you feel feedback from the road, even in its most aggressive drive setting. And as our colleagues at Car and Driver have pointed out, the steering feel doesn’t quite have the precision you get from six figures.”

But with a base price under $60,000, the Corvette more than delivers its money’s worth to owners.

PM says the $100,000 718 Cayman and Spider are “slightly more engaging (though slower) driving experiences” thanks to their six-speed manual transmission over the Corvette’s new dual-clutch automatic.

“But for those of us who like a little utility in a two-seater,” PM says, “the Corvette is a good balance.”

Ironically, the gasoline-powered Corvette breaks a three-year-long streak of electric vehicles earning the Car of the Year award. We wouldn’t be surprised, though, when the rumored E-Ray electric hybrid version of the Corvette debuts in a couple of years or so, if that car doesn’t restore order to the PM universe and win this award again.


Source:
Popular Mechanics


What Does the Z-Mode Button Do in the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette?

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2020 Chevrolet CorvetteCars.com photo by Mike Hanley

From its exterior design to its driving experience, there are so many remarkable new qualities of the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette compared to its predecessor. We’ve already given GM’s iconic sports car the full review treatment and have covered what it’s like in everyday driving, but a new steering-wheel button in the 2020 Vette caught my eye during a recent test drive.

Positioned to the left of the horn pad is a silver-colored button with a lone letter Z on it. At first glance, it looks like the Z logo from Nissan’s famed sports car, but it actually pays homage to the Corvette’s long history with the letter Z; the letter has appeared over the years in the form of high-powered versions (ZR1 and Z06) and performance option packages (Z51).

chevrolet-corvette-2lt-z51-2020-01-controls--interior--steering-wheel.jpg
2020 Chevrolet CorvetteCars.com photo by Mike Hanley

Pressing the button activates Z-Mode, one of two new driver-configurable modes on the 2020 Corvette (the other new mode is dubbed MyMode). Like the M buttons on some BMW models, the Corvette’s Z button lets drivers instantly select their preferred performance settings.

While the MyMode, Weather, Tour, Sport and Track modes are selected using a knob on the center console, Z-Mode is only accessible from the steering wheel. In addition to the exhaust sound, steering, suspension (when equipped with Magnetic Ride Control) and braking settings that are configurable within MyMode, Z-Mode also includes a powertrain setting that controls gas pedal, transmission and engine response.

The inclusion of new customizable drive modes are welcome additions for a car like the Corvette, but how the driver controls these modes is just as important. Combining the Corvette’s configurable features into one button with Z-Mode is smart, and putting it on the steering wheel where it’s easy to activate is doubly so.

 Mike Hanley for Cars.com


2020 Corvette Stingray is the Official Pace Car of the 104th Indianapolis 500

2020 Corvette Stingray is the Official Pace Car of the 104th Indianapolis 500


We’ve been expecting to hear this news and finally today it has been confirmed by Chevrolet that the new 2020 Corvette Stingray will be the official Pace Car of the 104th Indianapolis 500. This marks the 17th race that Corvette has served as the official Pace Car, and the 31st Chevrolet to lead the field.

This year’s running of the Indy 500 will take place on Sunday, August 23 with the race being shown live on NBC.

With no fans allowed in attendance this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the official pace car driver will be GM President Mark Reuss.

2020 Corvette Stingray is the Official Pace Car of the 104th Indianapolis 500


“It’s truly an honor to have the opportunity to be behind the wheel of the mid-engine Corvette Pace Car at such a historic race as the Indy 500,” said GM President Mark Reuss. “The 2020 Corvette Stingray is the result of a close collaboration between the Corvette Racing and production engineering teams, setting a new benchmark for supercars around the world.”


The 2020 Corvette Stingray Pace Car is Torch Red and features the high Wing Spoiler and ground effects package. The Z51 Coupe will also wear the 104th Indy 500 livery on the doors. The new 2020 Stingray is capable of accelerating from 0-60 in 2.9 seconds and has a top speed of 194 mph, so it should have no trouble in setting the pace for the IndyCar racers.

2020 Corvette Stingray is the Official Pace Car of the 104th Indianapolis 500


“This is a continuation of our outstanding partnership with Chevrolet,” Indianapolis Motor Speedway President J. Douglas Boles said. “We’re so grateful for all that Chevrolet has contributed to the success of our events. The Torch Red 2020 Corvette Stingray is a world-class machine rich with speed, performance and excitement, perfectly suited to pace the ‘500′ field.”

Chevrolet has been linked to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway with both entities founded in 1911. Company founder and namesake Louis Chevrolet and his brothers Arthur and Gaston raced in the early 500-mile races with Gaston winning the race in 1920. Today, Louis Chevrolet rests in peace in a local Indianapolis cemetery just 15 minutes away from the track.

2020 Corvette Stingray is the Official Pace Car of the 104th Indianapolis 500
2020 Corvette Stingray is the Official Pace Car of the 104th Indianapolis 500

Update

This afternoon we came across this Facebook post from Corvette Exterior Design Manager Kirk Bennion sharing these words from fellow GM designer Adam Barry who led the project. The 2020 Corvette Pace Car features a number of items from Genuine Corvette Accessories as discussed:

2020 Corvette Indy 500 Pace Car


Source:
Indianapolis Motor Speedway


Deemed the ‘Ultimate L88’, this rare classic is expected to reach a staggering hammer-down price of $5 million at Mecum.

Rare and collector cars tend to sell for a king’s ransom at auction often fetching hundreds of thousands – if not millions – of dollars. One particular ultra-rare 1967 Chevrolet Corvette may just break the record as the most expensive one to ever be sold at auction. This classic L88-equipped 1967 Corvette convertible is expected to reach a staggering hammer-down price of $5 million.

<img src="1967-corvette-use-1.png" alt="1967 Chevrolet Corvette L88">
Mecum

Why would it go for so much? This Corvette is just one of 20 examples for the 1967 model year equipped with the high-performance L-88 package. According to Mecum, this model has been dubbed the “Ultimate L88” with this one being the finest example ever offered. An ultimate car comes with an ultimate price tag, and this one should fall somewhere between $4 million and $5 million when it’s all said and done.

The L88 was introduced by Chevrolet to turn “America’s Sports Car” into a race-oriented powerhouse. Under the hood sits a 427-cubic-inch big-block L88 V8 engine mated to a 4-speed manual transmission that shifts over 500-horsepower to the pavement. Not only that, handling was drastically improved with the addition of a heavy-duty suspension. To save weight, the car lacks a heater, fan shroud, and radio.

Making this particular ’67 Corvette (serial number 21550) even more special is the fact that engineer Cliff Gottlob started the car’s racing career. Gottlob, a Kansas local, bought the car when it was brand new and drove it to and participated in the 1970 Daytona 24-hour race where he nabbed second place in the GT category and 11th overall. Until 1975, Gottlob continued to race the L88 -equipped car. In 1978, the car went under the knife for a full restoration after being snatched up by Jim Krughoff and David Burroughs.

Still retaining the original L88 V8 engine, this ’67 Corvette is in flawless condition. Just in case the buyer doesn’t want to add any additional mileage to the original engine, the car comes with a spare mill. Also included with the sale are old-school photographs of the car racing back in the ’70s, an original window sticker, factory ID card, and dealer invoice.

As of now, this rare Corvette has a current bid of $150,000. In order to become the most expensive Corvette ever sold at auction, the car needs to top the $3.85 million winning bid placed on the red 1967 Corvette coupe that was sold back in 2014 at Barrett-Jackson. The Mecum website has this car estimated to reach the aforementioned $4 million to $5 million which would make this rare L88-equipped 1967 Chevy Corvette the priciest Corvette ever to cross an auction stage.

Source: Mecum


Everything You’ve Ever Wanted To Know About Hot Wheels (But Never Asked)

Many gearheads have a strange affinity to Hot Wheels. Here is everything you’ve ever wanted to know about the company, but never asked.

Toy cars can be divided into two categories: Hot Wheels and everybody else. For over 50 years, Mattel has dominated with what is now recognized as the best-selling toy in the world. It’s impossible to count how many car buffs, from mechanics to real race stars to TV personalities, grew up playing with these cars. Whether it was just a few models or massive collections, Hot Wheels has been part of car culture for decades and is never going to stop. Whether it’s a simple model or some fancy licensed vehicle, Hot Wheels simply enthralls.

Yet it’s incredible how some people are unaware of the facts of the company and its history. From its unique origins to how these cars are put together, the story behind Hot Wheels is fascinating. There are also touches from how some of these cars are more expensive than real ones to some unique touches on the culture. Here are 20 amazing facts about Hot Wheels to prove they’re more than just “kids toys.”‘

20/20 Real-Life Hot Wheels Jump Was A World Record

Growing up a massive Hot Wheels fan, racer Tanner Foust decided to honor them in a fun way. At the 2011 Indy 500, Foust talked the management into seeing up a massive orange ramp and raced down it in a rally car.

After 90 feet of track, Foust sailed 332 feet, the longest record for such a move. He topped it by driving through a 66-foot loop in 2012 to live out the dreams of every kid.

19 Technology In Car Building Is Amazing…

Making toys has become a very high-tech business today. Just like real car companies, Hot Wheels has adapted to the 21st century nicely. Computers and 3-D technology are utilized to make sure the designs are perfected before the building begins.

It also helps them keep on top of the latest car trends to ensure that today’s Hot Wheels are sleeker and more natural than the ones of the past.

18 But They’re Still Diecast

There are many toy car lines out there, but Hot Wheels is still the king of the bunch. The key reason is that, for all the advances in technology, every car is still diecast and built mostly by hand.

Even when cheaper materials are available, Mattel knows the diecast is what the fans want. It’s also helped in making customized cars at home for popular models. After 50 years, Mattel doesn’t want to mess with success and do away with diecast.

17 They’ve Worked With NASA

Hot Wheels have done a few astronaut-themed toys over the years. But that’s not the only connection they have with NASA. In 1998, they were able to work with the agency to create an exact replica of the Mars Rover, which landed on the Red Planet that very year.

They also worked with them in 2012 for scale models of the Curiosity rover. It’s amazing how the company got access to top-secret plans to make these toys.

16 Collectors Take It Seriously

Some may dismiss Hot Wheels as “just for kids.” But collectors take it more seriously than real automobiles. The 1969 Volkswagen Beach Bomb (only 16 prototypes were made) is known to go for at least $15,000.

Some rare models can go for a hundred grand, and collectors are always on the lookout for unique mint models. Entire museums are devoted to various cars as some Hot Wheels collections put legit car collectors to shame.

15 Scaling Down The Cars Was Tricky

A key to the company’s success is that they work with scores of real car companies to get looks at plans for their toy models. Yet it’s not so simple as just “make a smaller version.” The biggest challenge is to achieve the proper scale for the toys in a diecast model yet retain the details of the actual car.

That can be complex with some fancy vehicles. That every model has to be sized to fit the same tracks just adds to why it takes as long developing a toy car as a real one.

14 NASCAR Star Has The Record For The Longest Track

Ever since the Hot Wheels tracks were created, fans have been trying to top themselves making the most extended and most complex. A few have achieved great ones, but it’s fitting a NASCAR star holds the record for the longest.

In 2019, Joey Logano unveiled a 1,941-foot long track stretched across his garage. It weaves through his car collection with 1222 boosters before ending in Logano’s own 2018 HW Ford Mustang. Add yet another title to Logano’s list of accolades.

13 They Made A Car Coated In Diamonds

In 2008, Mattel made a big deal of celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Hot Wheels line. As a special reward, Mattel had Jasons of Beverly Hills craft the most expensive Hot Wheels car on the planet.

Cast in 18-karat gold, it’s covered with 2700 diamonds and gems totaling nearly $150,000 today. It’s become a rotating exhibit at toy museums for the glitziest Hot Wheels you could see.

12 The Darth Car Is A Speed Machine

While they do stick to toys, the company has been busy creating some real-sized cars for collectors. One of the most notable is based on Darth Vader, with the hood looking like his fearsome helmet and in jet black.

This isn’t just for show as it’s based on a C5 Corvette with a GM LS3 V-8 engine capable of 526 hp and 150 mph. The Dark Lord of the Sith would be proud of this powerful craft.

11 Every Car Is Tested To Make Sure It Can Run A Track

Almost from the beginning, Hot Wheels car fans had to have a track with the cars. They’ve gone from straight lines to elaborate roller-coaster-like loop systems to leave kids entertained for hours.

What few realize is that the track determines if a car makes it as Mattel prides itself on “every car can fit every track.” More than once, a prototype has to be altered when it won’t fit as the track decides a car’s final form.

10 There Are More Hot Wheels Cars Than Real Cars

While it’s tricky to figure out for sure, most sources agree there are at least one billion cars on the planet (give or take a few hundred thousand in auto graveyards). In contrast, since 1968, six billion Hot Wheels cars have been created.

True, many have been trashed and/or recycled, and it’s impossible to count how many have been lost in backyards. But given how 16 cars are produced every second, it’s no shock the toys outnumber the real deals.

9 Several Creators Are Legit Car Designers

The one constant of Hot Wheels is that the cars look just as good as the real deal. There’s an excellent reason for that as scores of the manufacturers are legitimate car designers. Larry Wood was a veteran of Ford before becoming one of the first Hot Wheels designers.

He’s not alone as Jack Ryan was a rocket designer who crafted the bearings that made the cars so great. Scores of the car designers were in real automobiles first, so it’s no wonder the vehicles look so good.

8 The Original Camaro Is Worth A Fortune

Mint conditions of the Original 16 Hot Wheels releases are all pretty collectible items. But one dominates from the pack. While versions of a Camaro were produced, a few had white enamel paint.

They had been meant to discover flaws in a prototype but accidentally released. A mint version of one went for a hundred thousand dollars and made this one of the most expensive toys on the planet

7 They Released A Custom Corvette Before GM Did

An early standout for the company at a custom Corvette in 1968. What made it notable was that the toy was released before GM had their actual Corvette in car dealerships.

The fact designer Harry Bradley had worked at GM indicates he may have “borrowed” the designs before he left to allow Mattel to beat GM to releasing a Corvette to the masses.

6 The Red Stripes Are Expensive

If you find what looks like an old Hot Wheels car, take a good look at the wheels. If they have red stripes, then you’ve just found a fantastic collector’s item. From 1968 to 1977, designers hand-painted red lines onto the wheels to make the cars look distinctive.

As a cost-cutting measure, they switched to all-black wheels in 1978. Some mint condition red-striped vehicles have been known to go for thousands online.

5 One Of The Original Cars Was Based On A Car With No Doors

The first wave of Hot Wheels was just 16 cars, and any of them can be valuable today. One is notable, the 1965 Dodge Deora. This car boasted no doors but rather a hatch for folks to crawl into.

It was based on a fun design used by Mike and Larry Alexander but in an irony, no real Dodge Deoras were built, to make this a truly unique model

4 A Tie-In Cartoon Got Pulled By The FCC

Today, cartoons based on toy lines are commonplace. But in 1969, Hot Wheels got in trouble when they put out a cartoon series about some teenage car drivers. Despite good messages, the show was hit by complaints about being a “half-hour commercial.”

The FCC agreed, and it was yanked off the air. The company was just ahead of their time with a cartoon tie-in for a hit toy line.

3 There’s A Fight On Where The Name Came From

Much of Hot Wheels is shrouded in myth, and that includes just where the name comes from. The familiar story is that when Eliot Handler saw the first models from designer Fred Adickes, he remarked: “those are some hot wheels you’ve got there.”

Another version is that Handler just blurted the name out in a meeting with a designer. Regardless, it just stuck to become one of the most popular toys on the planet.

2 They’re Number One…Because They Remain So Cheap

In the ranks of the most popular toys on the planet, Hot Wheels dominates. They’re not just the biggest toy vehicle sellers but also the number one selling toy in the entire world. The reason is that in many markets, the cars can still go for only a dollar each.

True, they can be put out in packs, and some nations charging a few bucks more. But many stores do sell the cars for less than a bottle of water, which is the reason they are so dominant.

1 Its Creator Was Married To Barbie’s Creator

Elliott and Ruth Handler were the First Couple of the toy world. The two had founded Mattel as a picture frame company in 1945. While making a dollhouse, Ruth decided to craft a series of dolls she named Barbie.

It was an instant hit to make Mattel a success. Elliott then realized how a toy car line could be great for boys to craft what would become Hot Wheels. The two remained together until Ruth’s death in 2002 (Elliott passed on nine years later) to be icons of their industry.

Sources: Mentalfloss.com, hotwheels.com, hotwheelsmedia.com, thrillist.com


Watch a Track-Day Comparison Between the Shelby GT500 and C8 Corvette

Both cars retail for about $81,000, but one is a lot more accessible.

SPEED PHENOM ON YOUTUBE

If you’ve got $80,000 to spend and want an American high-performance car, now’s a pretty good time to be in the market. In addition to tire-shredding stalwarts like the Camaro ZL1 and Challenger Hellcat, Ford and Chevy have recently launched high-profile, track-ready sports cars. And thanks to a new video by Speed Phenom, we now know how they directly compare on track.

Naturally, we wanted to do this comparison ourselves. But the GT500 wasn’t ready during our Performance Car of the Year competition when we had an early C8 to test. And now that both cars are on sale, stay-at-home orders and track closures mean we’ll have to wait for an opportunity to do a full R&T comparison.

In the meantime, Speed Phenom does a good job of breaking down how they perform. With the caveat that he’s got a base model GT500 without the optional Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires, he notes that the car struggles for grip more often than the similarly-tired Corvette. It’s also less composed through mid-corner bumps, with slower cornering all around. Thanks to its massive horsepower advantage, though, it jets through straightaways.

The C8, meanwhile, benefits from serious mechanical grip. The better-balanced midship car fires through corners and has no problem putting its power down. That makes it more approachable, not surprising given that it’s the tamest version of the C8 while the GT500 is stretching the limits of the S550 platform. We’re sure to see more track-ready Corvettes soon, but for now the Stingray is a surprisingly capable start.

Mack Hogan- Road&Track


Watch a C8 Mid-Engine Corvette Hit 173 MPH on a Dry Lake Bed

Even off the pavement, the new ‘Vette is a rocket ship.

The 2020 C8 Chevy Corvette is a fast car. In base form, it can hit a staggering 194 mph flat-out. Even with the drag-inducing Z51 performance package, the car can still do 184. Hennessey Performance took theirs to 182 mph with ease before they turbocharged it to oblivion. Now, there’s another C8 top-speed run on the internet, and this time, it takes place on a dry lake bed.

Popular YouTube TheStradman took his new Z51-equipped Corvette to a dry lake bed in Utah to test out the top speed of the car. He managed to hit an impressive 173 mph before slowing down—not bad considering the uneven and bumpy surface. It helps that there’s absolutely nothing for miles in either direction. In fact, from inside the cabin, it looks a bit uneventful. Here’s a perspective from outside the car to give you a sense of how fast 173 mph is:

If the base Corvette is this quick right out of the box, we’re curious to see how the upcoming Z06 stacks up. Considering the last-gen car could hit 200 mph, we’re expecting big things.

Source: Brian Silvestro; for RoadandTrack


Mid-Engined Chevy Corvette Video Analyses The 2LT Interior

The Goldilocks zone of Corvette C8 interiors?

By now, you should know that Chevrolet has started deliveries of the mid-engine 2020 Corvette. Lucky owners of the ‘Vette C8 are starting to receive their newest toy and most likely you’ve already seen one on the streets – that’s if the state you’re in is not affected by the coronavirus lockdown.

If you’re among those who are planning to purchase the new Corvette but are undecided with the trim level to choose, this video might be able to help you – especially if you’re particular with a car’s interior.

The Corvette C8 comes with three trim levels: 1LT, 2LT, and 3LT. The differences lie mainly in the features offered on each trim level, which defines that the cabin will look and feel like. That’s pretty important, considering that we spend so much time inside the car rather than staring at our investment from a distance. So, here’s a little guide.

The base 1LT trim isn’t really basic. With the entry-level trim, you already get the GT1 seats wrapped in mulan leather, a customizable 12-inch gauge cluster, push-button ignition and keyless entry, and an 8-inch Chevy MyLink infotainment system with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, 4G LTE Wi-Fi, and 10-speaker Bose sound system. The Corvette 1LT trim is available in three color options: black, gray, or red.

Going up the 2LT trim gives you more interior color options plus features like a rearview camera mirror, a colored head-up display, heated/cooled seats, heated steering wheel, advanced blind-spot monitor, and rear cross-traffic warning. The infotainment gets upgraded as well with a wireless charger and a 14-speaker Boss audio system.

Finally, the 3LT trim dials up the ante by adding a premium Nappa leather with suede microfiber accents – all in combination with the GT2 seats that have more bolsters. These seem not a lot but the range-topping trim adds luxury to the sports coupe.

If you’re still undecided, watch the 2LT interior review on top of this page to check whether you need to take it down a notch to 1LT or go all out on the top-level 3LT.

Source: HorsePower Obsessed


How to Pump Gas without Passing Germs Around

The etiquette of doing something you do regularly while staying safe and clean.

  • We might need new gas-pumping etiquette rules for the 21st century, both for selfish and altruistic reasons.
  • We’ve known since 2011 that gas pump handles can be filthy—they’re worse than ATMs or escalators, even—but there’s no reason to worry if you take the right precautions.
  • You can lower your risk by using gloves or paper towels to gas up, using touch-free pay options, and staying as physically separate from others as possible as you refuel.

You may have heard this one before: the best way to avoid catching some sort of communicable disease is to wash your hands well, and often. This advice isn’t exactly new, which hints at how reasonable and responsible it is.

Washing your hands to stay clean was the takeaway lesson from a 2011 study conducted by Kimberly-Clark Professional, which found gas pump handles were “the filthiest surface that Americans encounter on the way to work,” according to Reuters. The Los Angeles Times reported back then that the study found 71 percent of gas pump handles the Kimberly-Clark researched tested were considered “‘highly contaminated’ with the kinds of germs most associated with a high risk of illness.” Compare that to only 41 percent of ATM buttons and 43 percent of escalator rails.

The Kimberly-Clark Professional tests were done in big cities (Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, Miami, and Philadelphia) almost a decade ago, but when something like the coronavirus impacts pretty much every corner of the world, it’s a good reminder to take care when gassing up. When it comes to the COVID-19 coronavirus specifically, the National Institutes of Health has issued information that explains that coronavirus can be stable for 24 hours on some surfaces like cardboard and “up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel.”

If you’re not already carrying disinfecting wipes in the car with you, this is a good time to start, assuming you have some available, and wipe off the pump handle and touchscreen, or any other surfaces you plan to touch, before your hands make contact. Even better, it might be a good idea to search out a station that accepts contactless payment at the pump, so you won’t need to come into physical contact with the touchscreen or anything else other than the pump handle. Two easy solutions to this issue are to either wear gloves or to use the paper towels commonly provided for window cleaning as a guard between your hands and the screen, buttons, and pump handle. Keeping gloves in the car is a good idea, but they shouldn’t be the disposable sterile gloves that hospitals can use when there’s a need for them there. If you don’t have gloves, keep some hand sanitizer in the car to use on your hands after filling up.

As for social distancing, it’s convenient that gas pumps are relatively far apart from one another, contagion-wise, but even so, choosing to fill up your tank at an off-peak time can be safer. If there are other people getting gas at the same time, keeping at least six feet between you and them is a good idea for everyone involved. And it should go without saying that you shouldn’t go into the store unless there’s a reasonable need to do so if there’s still a rapidly spreading disease going around.

The actual chance that you will catch a transmittable viruses at the gas station is low. As the Illinois TV station ABC-20 reported based on answers from a medical expert, the sequence of events that have to happen to get the virus from someone who has it (someone coughing onto the pump handle or touching the touchscreen with virus on their hands, and then you touching it and then your face) can be interrupted in any number of ways. Even so, there’s no harm in being extra careful in these potentially dangerous times.

Sebastian Blanco- Car and Driver


Hennessey’s twin-turbo C8 Chevy Corvette V-8 makes 643 horsepower early in development

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray undergoes twin-turbo conversion at Hennessey
2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray undergoes twin-turbo conversion at Hennessey
2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray undergoes twin-turbo conversion at Hennessey
2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray undergoes twin-turbo conversion at Hennessey
2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray undergoes twin-turbo conversion at Hennessey

It took 30 hours for Hennessey Performance Engineering to tear apart a new 2020 Chevrolet Corvette, install twin-turbo setup, and put it back together.

It’s no surprise, then, that the twin-turbo C8 Corvette isn’t ready to be sold to customers. The engine lacks intercoolers and Hennessey hasn’t cracked the code of GM’s new electrical architecture to reprogram the ECU.

“This is just the beginning, our own car, doing R&D,” company founder and CEO John Hennessey told Motor Authority.

On Monday, the engine made 643 horsepower and 570 pound-feet of torque at the wheels on a Dynojet dyno while running just 5 psi of boost. That compares to baseline testing HPE performed on the stock car which revealed 466 hp and 451 lb-ft of torque. HPE plans to offer a 1,200-hp version of the C8, which Hennessey said could make 18-20 psi of boost.

Hennessey took delivery of an orange C8 Corvette in Detroit on March 13. He and his daughter, Emma, drove back to the performance outfitter’s Texas headquarters and performed baseline testing before the Hennessey team tore apart the car.

The orange C8 fired back to life on Friday with twin 62-mm Precision Turbos and twin blow-off valves connected to the throttle body mounted behind the catalytic converters. Both turbos are oil-cooled with twin scavenge pumps that feed back into the motor.

The system is not intercooled. Instead, there’s a methanol injection setup to keep things from getting too hot. HPE is considering where to put intercoolers. The current packaging has limited space for intercoolers without cutting into trunk space, which Hennessey does not want to do. 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray undergoes twin-turbo conversion at Hennessey

Hennessey told Motor Authority his team currently can’t tune the factory ECU, but it is looking at aftermarket solutions for the engine management system. He noted it took a year for solutions to come to market for the C7 and added, “hopefully, it won’t take a year.”

Hennessey said when the turbocharged C8 was first started it didn’t throw any codes, errors, or a check engine light. “The computer seems happy with the turbos,” Hennessey noted. A check engine light did appear when the front wheel speed sensors were disconnected to put the car on the dyno, Hennessey said.

The orange C8 will used for R&D of upcoming modifications. Hennessey said he doesn’t expect to deliver modified customer C8s for at least six months, and all will have intercoolers and full plumbing.

Joel Feder for Motor Authority


The Corvette’s Hybrid Future Is Hiding in Plain Sight

Chevrolet has kept quiet about whether an electrified midengine Corvette is in the works, but the owners manual apparently didn’t get the memo.

OK, so “plain sight” might be a bit of an overstatement, but further evidence that a hybrid midengine Chevrolet Corvette is in the cards is right there—if you know where to look. And in this case, you have to look at page 244 of the 2020 Corvette owners manual. You can download your very own copy in PDF form right here if you so desire.

As the wonderful Chevy nerds at Corvette Blogger (who brought this tidbit to our attention) explain, it all has to do with fuses, or at least designated spaces on the Corvette’s rear compartment fuse block.Related Story20 Coupes You Can Buy Instead of the C8 Corvette

First up is fuse No. 7, “Power sounder module/Pedestrian friendly alert function.” That’s a fancy term for the noise electrified cars must make when they are not running on internal combustion power (if they even have an IC engine onboard) in order to keep the people around them aware of their presence. Usually this sound is some sort of vaguely futuristic whir, whine or murmur.

Then, there’s fuse No. 12, which works in conjunction with a “Lithium ion battery module.”

2020 Chevrolet Corvette fuse block with indications of future hybrid powertrains

The owners manual information for the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette’s rear fuse block. Pay special attention to slots 7 and 12.CHEVROLET

The latter implies a hybrid system, and the former isn’t necessary on any vehicle that isn’t capable of running, for at least a short distance, on electric power. Neither of these things are true about the 2020 Corvette, though they’d be necessary in the rumored Corvette hybrid. And it would make sense that, if such a car were planned, Chevrolet would build a certain amount of infrastructure for hybrid systems into the car from the very beginning—especially when you’re dealing with something as fundamental as a fuse block.

(For the record, we looked through owners manuals for other new Chevrolet vehicles, including the Blazer; there’s no fuse block openings for these systems, implying that they aren’t something GM simply includes by default as a sort of “just in case” contingency.)Related StoryThe New Midengine Corvette Is a Blast to Drive

This is hardly the first time we’ve speculated about a hybrid Corvette. Such a car would likely place a motor up front (there’s room for one ahead of the front bulkhead, right in between the two front wheels) and tuck batteries away in the center of the car, probably nice and low in a tunnel between the two seats, in order to maintain a low center of gravity and balanced front-rear weight distribution. What remains unknown is what gasoline engine such a system would complement.

A hybrid Corvette could stick with the regular car’s 6.2-liter naturally aspirated LT2 V8, but video suggests that a flat-plane crank V8 appears to be in the works, as well. Giving either of those engines an extra 100-plus hp and all-wheel drive by adding an electric motor to the mix would turn an affordable supercar into an all-American exotic.

In any case, it’s clear that this is just the beginning for the midengine Corvette—and that speculation on what’s next hasn’t died down even after the model’s debut.

Graham Kozak for AutoWeek


[VIDEO] Watch this 2019 Corvette ZR1 Hit 191 MPH in the Standing Mile

Oh ZR1, how quickly we have forgotten you and moved on to the C8. But then comes along a video like this that reminds us that even with an engine upfront, you are still one of our favorites!

All kidding aside, the 2019 Corvette ZR1 is one of our favorite Corvettes of all time particularly because of the things it could do, like shooting down a former Space Shuttle runway at Cape Canaveral at nearly 200 MPH!

Typically we see these high speed runs with a ZR1 that has the ZTK’s High Wing. This Long Beach Red Corvette ZR1 has the low wing for less drag and it seems to definitely show off its speed in this standing mile run in which the Corvette reached a top speed of 191.16 MPH.

Two views are shown including the in-car with telemetry overlay on the screen. We see the car was still accelerating past the mile and we’re excited as they tell us that two more videos coming that show the ZR1 also running 2.3 miles and 2.7 miles down the runway.

The video comes the Johnny Bohmer Proving Grounds on Merritt Island Florida. Previously we have seen the Genovation GXE Electric Corvette run on the same track and in fact, it might be interesting to compare the two cars after the ZR1 shares the two final runs

From Johnny Bohmer Proving Grounds via YouTube:


C8 Corvette Secrets: The 2020 Corvette Has a Flying Car Mode

C8 Corvette Secrets: The 2020 Corvette Has a Flying Car Mode


As we continue to digest all the new information that came out of last week’s First Drive Event with the 2020 Corvette Stingrays in Las Vegas, there is a new “Mode” to discuss that most Corvette enthusiasts have never heard of.

The 2020 Corvette Stingray has several “modes” that help drivers get the most out of their cars. We are already familiar with the regular driving modes that feature settings for Weather, Touring, Sport and Track, as well as the two customizable modes called MyMode and Z-Mode. But what you may not be aware of is that the 2020 Corvette Stingray’s equipped with Magnetic Ride Control also features a “Flying Car” mode.

Well, it is the 21st century after all!

Corvette’s Vehicle Performance Manager Alex MacDonald is responsible for the chassis tuning of the new Corvette and he was tasked with explaining much of the on-track performance capabilities of the new Corvette to those at Spring Mountain last week.

For the C8 Corvette, engineers have rolled out version 4.0 of Magnetic Ride Control with the biggest change to the system is the use of accelerometers rather than position sensors that measured wheel height. Here is the slide that was offered on the new Mag Ride for the C8 Corvette:

C8 Corvette Secrets: The 2020 Corvette Has a Flying Car Mode


The Magnetic Ride Control is tied into the Corvette’s Performance Traction Management system and that’s where the Flying Car Mode comes into play.

When your crest an incline and the Corvette’s wheels are off the ground, they will spin faster like they are on ice or another slippery surface because there is no resistance. The performance traction control senses that and sends commands to slow the wheels. But that’s not the best reaction when on the track. The system now senses when the car’s front wheels leave the ground (and assumes that the rears will be leaving as well), and the system tells the performance traction control to ignore it because it knows that it’s temporary and that all four wheels will be back on the ground momentarily.

Here is Alex talking about the Flying Car Mode:


“The other interesting note about MR is that it communicates with the performance traction system and it tells that performance traction system that if the front wheels have just gone over a big crest that we know that one wheel-base later the rear is about to go over that same crest, we can adapt the traction control to work in that situation and we call that Flying Car Mode, which is a cool name for it, because it does detect when the car is airborne and we can alter the chassis controls to deal what happens when the car lands.”


Source:
Video by Keith Cornett


Tech We Would Like to See on the C8 Corvette: Active Aero

Tech We Would Like to See on the C8 Corvette: Active Aero


With the highest performance versions of the seventh generation Corvette, customers were forced to make a choice. Did they want their car to have the highest possible top speed, or did they want to sacrifice some of that by bolting a slew of aerodynamic aids to their car for maximum cornering ability?

We would love for Chevrolet to take that decision out of the ordering equation for buyers of the upcoming Z models and the Grand Sport. They could give buyers the best of both worlds with the incorporation of Active Aerodynamics.

Active Aerodynamics can take many forms, from grille vents that close at high speeds to streamline a car, to suspension that lowers at speed to reduce lift. We know that the Corvette team would build a fully functional system that integrates several of these technologies into a cohesive package, just like they did on the C7 ZR1’s chassis-mounted wing and innovative balancing front underwing, but what we mostly want to focus on here is the most visible piece of such a system, the rear wing.

This unit would elevate both the performance and even the prestige of GM’s looming halo car. There are several benefits of an active rear wing that accompany their off-the-charts cool factor.

1. An active rear wing can be lowered, causing it, for all intents and purposes, to disappear, along with any drag that it was creating. Top-end General Motors Products have become so fast that the most track-worthy editions have suffered at the dragstrip because of massive fixed wings. The effects of the C7 Z06/Z07’s wickerbill spoiler have been well documented. Chevrolet officially listed the top speed of ZR1’s with the “big-wing” ZTK package as 10 MPH lower than their stock counterparts, and the Camaro ZL1 with the 1LE package has proven slower than the car it is based on, even in distances as short as a quarter-mile. Allowing these serious track performers to retract their wing, and the ZTK/Z07/1LE models become the best version of their respective model-line with no excuses or asterisks, which is what buyers that dole out more funds expect.

Causes of Aerodynamic Drag

Photo Credit: https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz


2. Just as these wings can retract to reduce drag and improve top speed, they can be “actively” placed in full “attack mode” for maximum downforce in the corners. This increases cornering speed, stability, and driver confidence which can lead to drastically lower lap times.

3. Upon hard braking, an active wing can also go vertical, transforming into an air brake. This assists the actual brakes, resulting in shorter stopping distances. It also keeps more weight in the rear of the car, again helping with stability and, especially in a rear-wheel drive car, improved corner exit speeds.

Car Magazine (UK)

Photo Credit: Car Magazine (UK)


All three of these traits brought to the table by an active wing radically assist the driver and make the car faster in all aspects. The coolest thing is that, with the right programming, the wing does all three automatically with seamless transitions, and, did we mention how awesome they also look?

There has been speculation about Active Aero coming to the Corvette for several years now. These rumors were fueled by GM’s own patent filings which showed a sketch of a C7 fitted with advanced aerodynamic trickery. We think the top dog mid-engine offerings are the perfect place for the General to finally deploy this technology that can already be found on the majority of the world’s supercars.

Corvette Blogger


Rare drawings, documents reveal secret history of mid engine Corvette

From an acclaimed concept car John DeLorean reportedly dismissed because he wanted something “smaller and more European,” to the design that ended a feud between a pair of GM giants — but may have set the Corvette back decades — a trove of unique documents, sketches and models tells a secret history of the 60-year quest to build a mid engine Chevrolet Corvette.

The story begins in the late 1950s with legendary Corvette chief engineer Zora Arkus-Duntov and came to fruition when the first mid engine 2020 Corvette Stingray sold for $3 million at auction in January.

Titled “The Vision Realized: 60 Years of Mid engine Corvette Design” and created by GM Design Archive & Collections, the exhibit included 19 original sketches by designers including Larry Shinoda and Tom Peters, the massive 4-Rotor rotary engine from the 1973 Aerovette engineering, a wood wind-tunnel model, even letters from Arkus-Duntov’s personal files.

“The story of the mid engine Corvette is incredibly complicated, full of fits and starts,” said Christo Datini, manager of the GM Design Archive & Collections.  Cristo Datini at the General Motors Warren Technical Center in Warren, Michigan on Friday, January, 31, 2020

Cristo Datini at the General Motors Warren Technical Center in Warren, Michigan on Friday, January, 31, 2020 (Photo: Eric Seals, Detroit Free Press)

A mid engine Corvette was a dream shared by GM designers and engineers. The layout, in which the engine is behind the passenger compartment and immediately over the rear wheels, improves acceleration and handling. It’s been a mainstay at Ferrari for decades, and inspired repeated design and engineering projects at GM. None of them made it to production till now, largely because the Corvette’s original front-engine layout was so successful.

“Why would we change the Corvette?” GM chairman and CEO Richard Gerstenberg said to Arkus-Duntov before both men retired in the mid-1970s. “We sell every one we can make.”

‘Design without limit’

A generation of GM designers and engineers had already fought that attitude toward the sports car that debuted in 1953 model, and a couple more would before the midengine eighth-generation C8 Corvette Stingray debuted last year.

The exhibition included dozens of sketches, models, photos and documents.

“Our mission is to preserve the heritage of GM Design and educate our designers on GM’s prominence in the world of design,” Datini said. The archive also is working with the Detroit Institute of Arts on a massive exhibition dedicated to automotive design that opens this summer. 

The Corvette exhibition closed at the end of January, but elements of it are likely to be displayed at other events and locations, possibly including the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Kentucky, which provided materials for the collection.Original magazines with drawings of what Corvettes could have looked like on display at the General Motors Warren Technical Center in Warren, Michigan on Friday, January, 31, 2020

Original magazines with drawings of what Corvettes could have looked like on display at the General Motors Warren Technical Center in Warren, Michigan on Friday, January, 31, 2020 (Photo: Eric Seals, Detroit Free Press)

Chevrolet Engineering Research Vehicle I, Also called SERV I and XP-708, was the beginning. A running model that debuted in 1960, the car had the looks of an Indy car and a chassis that tested what a midengine layout could do. It was “a design without limit” and an “admirable tool” to help Chevy figure out “what to put in Corvette,” said Duntov, himself a former driver in the 24 Hours of Le Mans sports car race.

CERV I was used as a test vehicle for years. Larry Shinoda, who would go on to be known as the father of the ’63 Corvette Stingray and the Mako Shark concept car, tweaked its design repeatedly as engineers tested it with seven different power trains.

GM eventually retired CERV I, selling it to the Briggs Cunningham Automotive Museum for $1. When the museum failed in the 1980s, GM bought it back for “somewhat more,” Datini said.A model of the 1968 Chevrolet mid-engine Corvette Roadster that is one of many items for General Motors workers to see at the Corvette design display at the General Motors Warren Technical Center in Warren, Michigan on Friday, January, 31, 2020

A model of the 1968 Chevrolet mid-engine Corvette Roadster that is one of many items for General Motors workers to see at the Corvette design display at the General Motors Warren Technical Center in Warren, Michigan on Friday, January, 31, 2020 (Photo: Eric Seals, Detroit Free Press)

Corvettes the world never saw

Shortly thereafter, Duntov heard rumors Ford was developing a Le Mans racer to challenge Ferrari and launched work on CERV II. GM decided not to race, Ford and Carroll Shelby built the GT40 that inspired “Ford vs. Ferrari,” and the CERV II was used as an engineering test bed at secret proving grounds and never seen by the public during its active lifetime. Built in 1964, CERV II had a 500-horsepower V8, 210-mph top speed and 2.8-second 0-60 mph time.

A picture of the CERV II Corvette. The sports car never went into production but it was influential in the design of the C5 production Corvette. (Photo: Eric Seals, Detroit Free Press)

“By that time, engineers and designers knew a midengine chassis was necessary” to get maximum performance from the ‘Vette, Datini said. Putting the engine behind the passenger compartment puts the car’s weight over the rear wheels to put down more power without spinning. Shifting balance from the production ‘Vette’s nose-heavy weight distribution would also improve handling.

Also in 1964, the XP-819 experimental car was being tested. Designed by Shinoda, it bore a strong resemblance to 1970 Corvettes, but Duntov hated it, calling it an “ugly duckling” at least in part because he wished his engineering team got some of the budget allotted to designing the car. It had a 327 cubic-inch V8 and pop-up headlights.

Like many concept and engineering vehicles, XP-819 was destroyed, chopped up. Years later, the pieces were found in NASCAR designer and mechanic Smokey Yunick’s garage.

Half Corvette, half Porsche

With a name GM would later recycle on a minivan, the Astro II XP-880 was never publicly identified as a Corvette, but it was one, intended for production in 1970, but never got there. It debuted at the New York auto show, featuring a nose, front fenders and Firefrost Blue paint that that foreshadowed 1970s production cars.

DeLorean, then Chevrolet general manager, asked for a rush program to create a different midengine design to match the midengine Pantera Ford was developing with Italian sports car maker De Tomaso to debut at the 1970 New York auto show. The XP-882 had a tapering body with dramatic fender flares and a louvered rear window like the Mako Shark II concept car. Like so many midengine ‘Vettes before and after, GM brass decided to stick with the tried and true front-engine layout.

Also in the 1970s GM president Ed Cole — another legendary engineer who led the development of the small block V8 and catalytic converter, among other achievements — became enamored with the Wankel rotary engine. Duntov built two midengine experimental ‘Vettes with rotary engines, glad for Cole’s support despite not sharing his enthusiasm for the engine.Sketching and notes about the Corvette, one of the many originals on display for workers to see at the General Motors Warren Technical Center in Warren, Michigan on Friday, January, 31, 2020

Sketching and notes about the Corvette, one of the many originals on display for workers to see at the General Motors Warren Technical Center in Warren, Michigan on Friday, January, 31, 2020 (Photo: Eric Seals, Detroit Free Press)

The 1973 Corvette 2-Rotor XP-987GT was a smaller, European-scale sports car with a rotary engine. The body was all Corvette, but its chassis came from a Porsche 914. Italian design house Pininfarina built its body. GM displayed the 2-Rotor at auto shows in Frankfurt and Paris before the car disappeared, probably sold to a collector.

Bill Mitchell’s most beautiful car

At the same time, Duntov wanted to develop a bigger midengine Corvette. He and Cole hadn’t been on speaking terms since Duntov refused an annual bonus he thought was insultingly small. They made up, at least in part because Duntov wanted a budget to develop what would become the Corvette 4-Rotor Aerovette, an iconic, gull wing design. Duntov believed it was the most beautiful vehicle GM design chief Bill Mitchell oversaw in a career that included the ’57 Chevy Bel Air and ’66 Buick Riviera. 

Duntov recycled the XP-882’s chassis for the Aerovette, which featured silver leather interior trim.A picture of the Aerovette featuring bi-fold gulping doors in the sports car that was never made. It is one of many photographs, drawings and sketches on display on all things Corvette design inside the General Motors Warren Technical Center in Warren, Michigan on Friday, January, 31, 2020

A picture of the Aerovette featuring bi-fold gulping doors in the sports car that was never made. It is one of many photographs, drawings and sketches on display on all things Corvette design inside the General Motors Warren Technical Center in Warren, Michigan on Friday, January, 31, 2020 (Photo: Eric Seals, Detroit Free Press)

Despite the car’s striking appearance, Duntov would come to believe his agreement to use a rotary engine was a nail in the midengine ‘Vette’s coffin.

Despite that, another midengine engineering car arrived in 1974. The XP-895 began its life with a steel body. Intrigued by the idea of lightweight materials, DeLorean asked Reynolds Aluminum to create an aluminum body. That cut the car’s weight by nearly 40%, but DeLorean pulled the plug on the project because he wanted a smaller, more European design.

That never happened, and design work on midengine ‘Vettes came to a halt for more than a decade, as GM struggled meeting the challenge of higher fuel prices.

Closing the deal

By 1986, the quest for a midengine Corvette was ready to create another giant figure, and it got one when a young designer named Tom Peters began work on the Corvette Indy concept car. Peters went on to become the chief designer of the sixth- and seventh-generation C6 and C7 Corvettes and play a key role in starting work on the 2020 C8.

With a radically short hood compared to production ‘Vettes and cutting-edge technologies including four-wheel steering, traction control and active suspension, the Indy — so named because it used a 2.65L V8 Chevy developed for Indy Car racing —  kept dreams of the midengine ‘Vette alive

The 1990 CERV III — this time the C stood for “Corporate,” not Chevrolet Engineering Research Vehicle — was the next step. Datini’s research convinced him it was an attempt at a production version of the Indy.

CERV III had scissors doors and was built of Kevlar, carbon fiber and aluminum. With a 650-hp twin-turbo 5.7L  V8, GM predicted a top speed of 225 mph. It debuted at the 1990 North American International Auto Show in Detroit.

After that, work on the midengine Corvette went undercover for two decades. Photos of disguised prototypes at test tracks surfaced from time to time, but the car seemed to be as much myth as metal. There are whispers the Great Recession halted work on one, setting development back years.A display of Zora Arkus-Duntov known as "The Godfather of  the Corvette" at the General Motors Warren Technical Center in Warren, Michigan on Friday, January, 31, 2020.

A display of Zora Arkus-Duntov known as “The Godfather of the Corvette” at the General Motors Warren Technical Center in Warren, Michigan on Friday, January, 31, 2020. (Photo: Eric Seals, Detroit Free Press)

Development of the 2020 Corvette Stingray began around eight years ago, a long time for most projects, but the blink of an eye when it’s the last chapter of a 60-year story.

Mark Phelan for Detroit Free Press


Exclusive! C8.R Corvette 5.5L DOHC V-8 Pics and How the Flat-Plane Crank Alters Its Iconic Sound

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There’s A New Engine In The C8.R Corvette, And It Sounds Nothing Like Its Predecessor.

They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and although that’s true, it can also be in the ear of the listener.

Since the Corvette first hit the streets back in the 1950s, it was imbued with the beautiful and nearly magical sound of V-8 performance. It was a deep, bass-filled rumble that just oozed a feeling of power. Over the years, the sound emanating from Corvettes, both on the street and at the track, had a distinctive note that became synonymous with the car. When the Corvette moved to the LS1 in 1997, the firing order was tweaked a bit, and although the sound did change, it still had that deep rumble that we all love.

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Chevrolet is super secretive of its new mill for the C8.R, so much so that it covered up the back hatch to keep out prying eyes. About all the team will say is that it’s a 5.5L DOHC V-8 fitted with a flat-plane crank. Power numbers are limited to 500 hp and around 475ish lb-ft of twist, but that’s all it will say. In fact this picture is about as close as you’re going to get to seeing the new C8.R engine.

But the only thing constant in the world is change. For the C8.R, Chevrolet Racing really changed things up with its new mid-engine marvel, but it wasn’t the engine placement that ended the car’s iconic sound signature. It was the engine itself. Gone is the deep baritone exhaust note, replaced instead with a high-pitched Ferrari-like sound. Think puberty in reverse. And although we love the sound of a wound-out Ferrari or other Italian supercars, having that pitch emanate from the back of a Corvette is something that will be hard to get used to. We’re not saying the sound is bad—it’s actually pretty badass—but it’s not even close to the sound signature we’ve come to associate with Corvettes.

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The real culprit here isn’t the new 5.5L DOHC V-8 that Chevrolet moved to. Instead, it was the choice to go with a high-revving flat-plane crank. This drastically changed the firing order of the engine and eliminated the classic American V-8 sound that’s typical with the firing sequence of a traditional cross-plane crank. But we know what you’re thinking: “Well, this is just the race car, so I’m going to be able to get my V-8 rumble fix from the production car!” Well, yeah, for now. You see, for Chevrolet Racing to run this new DOHC flat-plane crank mill in the C8.R, it has to, according to the rules, run a similar engine in at least 300 production cars. So does this mean that an eventual C8 Z06 variant will lose its iconic exhaust note?

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Chevrolet Racing tried hard to give race fans a great-sounding engine. And although the new 5.5L engine in the C8.R does have a unique sound, it’s nothing like we’ve grown accustomed to.
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‘Lost Corvettes’ to be given away: Photos of all 36 rare Chevrolet Corvette sports cars


52 PHOTOS2:11 p.m. EST Jan. 26, 2020This 1953 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1953 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1953 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1953 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROES

This 1954 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation. This 1954 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1954 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1954 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThese 1954 (left) and 1955 Corvettes will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.These 1954 (left) and 1955 Corvettes will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1954 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1954 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROES

This 1955 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1955 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1955 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1955 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1956 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1956 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1956 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1956 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROES

This 1957 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1957 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1958 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1958 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1959 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1959 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1960 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1960 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROES

This 1960 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1960 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1961 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1961 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1962 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1962 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1963 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1963 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROES

This 1964 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1964 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1965 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1965 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1965 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1965 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1966 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1966 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROES

This 1967 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1967 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1968 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1968 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1968 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1968 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROESThis 1969 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1969 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE HEROES

This 1970 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1970 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1970 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1970 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1971 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1971 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1972 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1972 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE

This 1973 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1973 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1973 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1973 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1974 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1974 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1975 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1975 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE

This 1975Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1975 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1976 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1976 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1976 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1976 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1977 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1977 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE

This 1978 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1978 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1979 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation. 1979 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1980 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1980 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1981 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1981 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE

This 1982 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1982 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1984 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1984 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1985 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1985 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1985 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1985 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE

This 1985 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1985 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1986 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1986 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1987 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1987 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThis 1988 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1988 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTE

This 1989 Corvette will be given away as one of the "Lost Corvettes" in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.This 1989 Corvette will be given away as one of the “Lost Corvettes” in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.CORVETTEThese Corvettes, known as the "Lost Corvettes," will be given away in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.These Corvettes, known as the “Lost Corvettes,” will be given away in a promotion by the Corvette Heroes to benefit the National Guard Educational Foundation.